Biogeography of Crustacea and Mollusca of the Subantarctic and Antarctic regions

Authors

  • Angelika Brandt Zoological Institute and Zoological Museum, University of Hamburg
  • Katrin Linse Zoological Institute and Zoological Museum, University of Hamburg
  • Ute Mühlenhardt-Siegel Zoological Institute and Zoological Museum, University of Hamburg

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3989/scimar.1999.63s1383

Keywords:

Zoogeography, Mollusca, Crustacea, Magellan region, Antarctica

Abstract


The Joint Magellan Victor Hensen Campaign in 1994 focused on the biogeographic relationships of the Antarctic and Magellan fauna. The Peracarida and Mollusca sampled at 18 stations in the Beagle Channel by means of an epibenthic sledge were compared with the knowledge about the distribution of species data from the Falkland Islands, South Georgia, Antarctica and the Kerguelen. Peracarida were an important fraction of the macrobenthos and sampled in high numbers. About 105,000 individuals were collected with the epibenthic sledge. Until now about 40 species of Amphipoda, about 42 species of Isopoda, 24 species of Cumacea, eight species of Mysidacea, and 16 species of Tanaidacea were found. 118 mollusc taxa were identified, nine species of Aplacophora, 52 of Gastropoda, five of Scaphopoda and 52 of Bivalvia. Although the species present different distribution trends, the zoogeographic comparison for six larger taxa (four Mollusca and two Peracarida) showed that the species similarities decreased from the Magellan region towards the Falkland Islands and from South Georgia to Antarctica. The Magellanic Gastropoda showed similarities with the fauna of the Falkland Islands and South Georgia (31-37 %), whereas the Bivalvia were more similar to the Antarctic fauna (29 %). With regard to Crustacea, 10% of Antarctic Isopoda species were also found in the Magellan region; the Weddell Sea and East Antarctica, and South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula shared most species of both Cumacea and Isopoda, whereas the lowest similarities were shown between Bellingshausen and Weddell Sea for the Isopoda, and interestingly between the Magellan region and South Georgia for the Cumacea. The highest degree of endemism of the Isopoda and Cumacea was found in the Magellan region, where as a consequence of the opening of the Drake Passage many new species seem to have evolved in these taxa.

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Published

1999-12-30

How to Cite

1.
Brandt A, Linse K, Mühlenhardt-Siegel U. Biogeography of Crustacea and Mollusca of the Subantarctic and Antarctic regions. Sci. mar. [Internet]. 1999Dec.30 [cited 2024May26];63(S1):383-9. Available from: https://scientiamarina.revistas.csic.es/index.php/scientiamarina/article/view/925

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